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"There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed. "
~Ernest Hemingway

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and chapbooks for sale at
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The August 2016 Newsletter is here!
Gloria Mindock and Tim Suermondt Book Launch
Welcome to the Cervena Barva Press Newsletter for August, 2016.
It has been awhile since a newsletter reached your way!
Some catch up news.
In 2015, we published 10 full-length books and 5 chapbooks.
So far this year, we have released:
  • Fire Tongue by Zvi A. Sesling (March, 2016)
  • Cimmeria by T. M. Devos (March, 2016)
  • The Last Gun by Anne Harding Woodworth (March, 2016)
  • Secret Letter by Erika Burkart, translated from the German by Marc Vincenz (June, 2016)
  • Duino by Martin Burke (June, 2016)
  • No More Happy Endings by Milan Djurasovic (July, 2016)

Read America Read

Here we go: The next Read America Read Project is Saturday, September 24th.

Old Phone Booth Davis Square Somerville, Ma Bathroom Davis Square Somerville, Ma

Leave a book for someone to take anywhere you want. This time, ask two people you know to do this also. This way the project will grow each month. I would like a book marker to go in every book so people know where they are coming from. Please e-mail me at the following e-mail address and I will send you an e-mail back with the book marker for you to print out and cut. Thank you for being a part of this project. Lets make September 24th great! Send me photos too. I have a list of names of who participated and as this grows, keep letting me know you are doing this. Thanks a zillion. You all rock. Lets get America reading!!!!


Thanks so much,

A Reading in Support of the World Poetry Movement's
World Poetry Action
Against the Proliferation of Nuclear Arms
and in Support of Worldwide Efforts for Peace

4 PM Saturday, October 22, 2016
The Democracy Center
Mount Auburn St.
Cambridge, MA

In a world where violence is ever increasing, where funds for education, jobs, health care are cut to the bone at the same time as funds for arms, munitions, and the military increase to record levels, a world where facilities for building new types of small/smart nuclear weapons are in the works, weapons that may make for some their use become thinkable.
Please Join Pam Annas, Mary Bonina, Kevin Bowen, Martha Collins, Gloria Mindock, Fred Marchant, Dorothy Nelson, Mark Pawlak, Tino Villaneuva, and others in an afternoon of readings in support of efforts of poets around the world to stop the proliferation of nuclear arms and support Worldwide efforts at Peace.
Admission is Free but donations to the victims of Hurricane Matthew in Haiti will be welcome.
Please note the Democracy Center is not Wheel Chair accessible, assistance will be provided if necessary, please call 781-492-1410

Cervena Barva Press Logo


Arts for the Armory
Basement, Room B8
191 Highland Avenue
Somerville, MA


Featuring: Paula Bonnell | Richard Peabody | Sue Standing

Paula Bonnell's poems have been published in three collections and many periodicals, including Gargoyle, which is published and co-edited by Richard Peabody. Her books are Airs & Voices, selected by Mark Jarman for the Ciardi Prize; Message, which includes "Midwest" (as heard on The Writer's Almanac) and "Eurydice" (chosen by Albert Goldbarth for a narrative-poetry publication award). Her chapbook Before the Alphabet is a novella in free verse about a child's kindergarten year, and her chapbook tales retold will be out next spring. Places where her poems have appeared include reviews – American Poetry, Hopkins, Hudson, Manhattan Poetry, Southern Poetry, and The Women's Review of Books – as well as Blue Buildings, Invisible City, Rattle, The Real Paper, and Rhino. Currently her website features several links to poems recently published in online journals, including two sequences.
Richard Peabody is the founder and co-editor of Gargoyle Magazine and editor (or co-editor) of 24 anthologies including Mondo Barbie, Conversations with Gore Vidal, and A Different Beat: Writings by Women of the Beat Generation. The author of a novella, three short story collections, and seven poetry books, he is also a native Washingtonian. Peabody taught fiction writing at Johns Hopkins University for 15 years. His new book is The Richard Peabody Reader (Alan Squire Publishers, 2015).
Sue Standing's poems have appeared in many journals, including Agni, The American Poetry Review, American Scholar, The Atlantic Monthly, Five Points, The Iowa Review, The Nation, Ploughshares, and Southwest Review. Her collections of poetry include Amphibious Weather (Zephyr Press); Deception Pass (Alice James Books); Gravida (Four Way Books); and False Horizon (Four Way Books). She has won a Pushcart Prize for her short story, "Fast Sunday," which was initially published in Ploughshares. The recipient of grants from the Fulbright Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Bunting Institute, she teaches creative writing and African literature at Wheaton College, in Norton, Massachusetts, where she directs the creative writing program.

Admission is $3.00. Refreshments served.


Featuring: Brad Rose | Elisabeth Weiss | Margaret Young

Brad Rose was born and raised in Los Angeles, and lives in Boston. He is the author of Pink X-Ray, a book of poetry and short fiction (Big Table Publishing, 2015 Brad is recipient of Camroc Press Review's, 2013 Editor's Favorite Poetry Award and the 2014 winner of unFold magazine's "FIVE (5) Contest" for his found poem "Signs of Reincarnation at Le Parker Meridien Hotel, NY, NY." Nominated for two Pushcart prizes in fiction, Brad's poetry and fiction have appeared in The Los Angeles Times, Folio, decomP, The Baltimore Review, The Midwest Quarterly, Lunch Ticket, San Pedro River Review, Off the Coast, Heavy Feather Review, Posit, Third Wednesday, Boston Literary Magazine, Right Hand Pointing, The Molotov Cocktail and other publications. He is the author of three electronic chapbooks, all from Right Hand Pointing: Democracy of Secrets, Dancing School Nerves, and Coyotes Circle the Party Store. Links to Brad's published poetry and fiction can be found at:
Elisabeth Weiss taught poetry in preschools, prisons, and nursing homes and as well as to the intellectually disabled. She now teaches writing at Salem State University. She's published poems in London's Poetry Review, Porch, Crazyhorse, Ibbetson Street Magazine, the Birmingham Poetry Review, the Paterson Literary Review and Muddy River Poetry Review and others. She won Talking/Writing Magazine's 2016 Hybrid Poetry Prize for The Anna Fragments. Her chapbook, The Caretaker's Lament, was published by Finishing Line Press in 2015. Elisabeth is a docent at the Lee Mansion in Marblehead and helps produce the yearly Massachusetts Poetry Festival in Salem. You can read more at her website:
Margaret Young grew up in Oberlin, Ohio and studied at Yale and University of California, Davis. She earned a 2005 Individual Artist Grant from the Ohio Arts Council and has published two poetry collections, Willow from the Willow (Cleveland State University Poetry Center, 2002) and Almond Town (Bright Hill Press, 2011). She lives in Beverly, Massachusetts, is on the faculty of the Global Center for Advanced Studies, and works as a teaching artist in area schools. Her website is

Admission is $3.00. Refreshments served.

Directions & parking:
The Center for the Arts is located between Davis Square and Union Square. Parking is located behind the armory at the rear of the building. Arts at the Armory is approximately a 15 minute walk from Davis Square which is on the MTBA Red Line. You can also find us by using either the MBTA RT 88 and RT 90 bus that can be caught either at Lechmere (Green Line) or Davis Square (Red Line). Get off at the Highland Avenue and Lowell Street stop. You can also get to us from Sullivan Square (Orange Line) by using the MBTA RT 90 bus. Get off at the Highland Avenue and Benton Road stop.

Released October 12, 2016
Melancolía Poems by Roberto Carlos Garcia
Roberto Carlos Garcia's chapbook amores gitano (gypsy loves) was published by Červená Barva Press in 2013. His poems and prose have appeared or are forthcoming in Public Pool, Stillwater Review, Gawker, Barrelhouse, Tuesday; An Art Project, The Acentos Review, Lunch Ticket, Bold As Love Magazine, Entropy, PLUCK!: The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, The Rumpus, 5 AM, Wilderness House, Connotation Press-An Online Artifact, Poets/Artists, Levure Litteraire, and others. Roberto also works with The Dodge Poetry Foundation's poetry in the classroom program. He is the founder of Get Fresh Books LLC: a cooperative press. Melancolía is his first book.
A native New Yorker, Roberto holds an MFA in Poetry and Poetry in Translation from Drew University, and is an Instructor of English at Union County College. His website is

Agitations both tender and muscular simmer inside these poems. A sadness that's palpable and physical haunts this poet; so does rage at the power-mongers' forces that keep children hungry, that fester poverty in terrifying mutations. Poet of engagement, Garcia speaks to the moon, to his sister, to the seasons and the garden, to his body a vessel: "these hands like a chunk of asteroid-full of taking & giving." This book offers us a photo-real blueprint of one man's life-space, an elegant blues-print of one man's heart, with direct utterance and lavish music.
-Judith Vollmer, Vollmer is the author of five full-length books of poetry, including The Apollonia Poems, forthcoming in 2017 as winner of the University of Wisconsin Press Four Lakes Poetry Prize.
Roberto Carlos García is, it seems to me, poet-kin of both Lorca and Neruda, but also things like rain, wind, the color yellow and the color green. In Melancolía we have a collection of gorgeously quiet poems rendered by intellect and the dream where lyricism is born out of the dusky space between mystery and the everyday. Here is a breathtaking archive of an imagination at work, a body made up of effort and world. See: "My friends I am not above you // I can hear the song of reckoning in the rose thorns" and "In my mouth Melancolía is an orchard, /a yellowing day & bluing night, // In my ribcage Melancolía is an ecstatic lilt /made of pearls, my heart-wet sand, /pungent as dogwoods."
-Aracelis Girmay is the author of three collections of poetry: The Black Maria (BOA Editions, 2016); Kingdom Animalia (BOA Editions, 2011), and Teeth (Curbstone Press, 2007). She is a Cave Canem fellow and teaches at Hampshire College and in the Drew University MFA program.
In these sensuous poems everything is up for inspection and interrogation, including the speaker himself. Here are echoes of Lorca and Neruda, their depth and power, but in a voice entirely the poet’s own. Roberto Carlos Garcia's poems take beauty as a gift, and also as a sometimes foil against capitalism and the numbness of the suburban life we are supposed to desire. "& what is poetry if not what we need?" We need poems like these, with their living language and their vision of where we are and where poetry, ecstatic and elegiac, can take us.
-Anne Marie Macari, author of Red Deer, (Persea, 2015)
These poems ache and plead and yearn, and never forget song. Never forget song.
-Ross Gay is the author of the National Book Award finalist Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2015), Bringing The Shovel Down (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011), Against Which (Cavan Kerry Press, 2006). He is an Associate Professor at Indiana University and a Cave Canem Fellow.
$17.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9981027-1-9 | 51 Pages

Released September 21, 2016
A Peaceful Color From The Silence by Gulnar Ali Balata
A Peaceful Color From The Silence by Gulnar Ali Balata
Gulnar Ali Balata is a Kurdish American poet, novelist, short-story writer, teacher, and translator. She was born in Kurdistan in 1974. Gulnar is the author of six books, three books of poems in the Kurdish language, Luna and Twelve Months (2006), Song of the Sad Ruins (2008), and A Breath from Letters of Borders Dream (2012) published in Duhok, Kurdistan. My Soul Still a Virgin is a collection of translated poems from Kurdish and Arabic to English by the author in 2010. My Poems Weep to the Seagulls (2014), is a book of poems published in Arabic, in Kurdistan. Kurdonya, a novel written in the Arabic language (2015), was published in Syria.
Gulnar has been published in numerous literary journals, websites and anthologies in Kurdish and Arabic languages, which are her first and second languages. Her work has been translated into many languages, and has been published in newspapers and magazines, in Kurdish and extensively on the internet.
She was a teacher in Kurdistan and taught English for three years before she left home in 1996. Gulnar received an Associate's degree in Art from Bunker Hill Community College in 2009.
She has participated in several poetry festivals within the Kurdish Region, and also abroad, in Turkey and Europe. From her outstanding cooperation, and successful writing, she has received awards from her work, and has been listed as one of the top Kurdish Women Voices in modern Kurdish poetry.

Gulnar Ali Balata's fourth volume of poetry, A Peaceful Color From The Silence, is an intimate gift by a mature poet infused with love for her tattered homeland of Iraqi Kurdistan. Her pen ripples with sparkling rivers and her expectant heart wrings with sadness as she infuses her poems in shooting stars and sweet dew, as "tears braid Fate's threads... shoulder/ the coffin of [her] childhood." The poet is "a weaned child," an "immigrant girl," a "lover," and "the melody for the executed." When "in exile... beyond the ocean... the coffins write [her] lines." This poet insists on the possibility of a "new page from a new sorrow/with a happy heart/ Make your name in my peace/symbol of a gorgeous love's spring." We take this journey with Balata and arrive strangely hopeful, crying tears of love for the resilience of the human spirit.
-Molly Lynn Watt, On Wings of Song and Shadow People
$17.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9966894-5-8 | 73 Pages

Released September 21, 2016
Benign Protectio by Anne Elezabeth Pluto (Anya Vladimirovna Pluta
Anne Elezabeth Pluto is Professor of Literature and Theatre at Lesley University in Cambridge, MA where she is the co-founder and artistic director of the Oxford Street Players. She was a member of the Boston small press scene in the late 1980s and started Commonthought Magazine at Lesley 24 years ago. Her chapbook, The Frog Princess, was published by White Pine Press. She has been a participant at the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference in 2005 and 2006. Her ebook, Lubbok Electric, was published by Argotist ebooks in 2012. Her latest work appears in, The Buffalo Evening News, Unlikely Stories: Episode IV, Mat Hat Lit, nycBigCityLit, and Pirene's Fountain.
Cover Artist:
Bryson Dean-Gauthier has been an artist since childhood, and as an adult has worked in the fields of graphic design, corporate communications, television and education. She has been a graphic design teacher for 15 years, currently with the Art Institute of Pittsburgh Online Division, and is also an instructional design consultant at New England Institute of Technology in Rhode Island. Bryson's current creative work explores photography, digital imaging and mixed media, and takes inspiration from the intersections of fine art, design, mystery, spirit, the natural world and technology.

Benign Protection is a ripe and vivid collection of 32 poems fraught with multi-generational hauntings. "Each breath is a prelude," as Pluto "gnaws through me to my bone." The intricacy of her language is rich on the tongue. Pluto is meant to be read aloud. Resonant and unforgettable.
-Meg Tuite, author of Bare Bulbs Swinging, Artistically Declined Press (2014)
Anne Pluto is one of the finest poets I know. I highly recommend Benign Protection.
-Kay Kinghammer, author, The Wenachee River Anthology, Melinda Cochrane International (2014), Inside the Circus, Loyal Stone Press (2013)
From the opening poem, "The River Styx", in Anne Elezabeth Pluto's Benign Protection, we are led into a sphere of grief artfully rendered by Pluto's deft hand. There are poems of domesticity that are welcome relief, but the breathing room is small. Grief is Pluto's handmaiden and we are enriched by such an exquisite companionship in this finely-wrought volume.
-Clare L. Martin, editor, MockingHeart Review. Author, Seek The Holy Dark, Yellow Flag Press (2017), Eating the Heart First, Press 53, (2012)
$7.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9981027-0-2 | 55 Pages

Released September 21, 2016
Housing for Wrens Poems by Edward Morin
Edward Morin was born in Chicago and, while growing up, spent summers in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. He has graduate degrees in English from The University of Chicago and Loyola University (Chicago) and has taught at seven Midwestern colleges and universities, including The University of Cincinnati, Wayne State University, and The University of Michigan.
His previous titles include Labor Day at Walden Pond (poems), The Dust of Our City (poems), and Transportation: Hot Tunes and Blues from Motor City (recorded songs). He is editor and co-translator of an anthology, The Red Azalea: Chinese Poetry since the Cultural Revolution (University of Hawaii Press). He has co-edited the anthology, Before There Is Nowhere to Stand: Palestine/Israel: Poets Respond to the Struggle (Lost Horse Press, 2012).
He has won prizes in nine national poetry contests and has had poems in Hudson Review, Prairie Schooner, River Styx, Poetry Northwest and many other magazines. His co-translations of Chinese, Arabic, and Greek poetry have appeared in Iowa Review, New Letters, Hayden's Ferry Review, and Banipal: Magazine of Modern Arab Literature. His articles and reviews have been published in The Georgia Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, and The Detroit News.
The author has worked as a writer for a few corporations. He has acted and sung in productions of several regional theatre and opera companies. He co-hosts The Crazy Wisdom Poetry Series in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and is editor of Peninsula Poets, the journal of the Poetry Society of Michigan. He lives with his wife in Ann Arbor.

Edward Morin has assembled lyrics and narratives touching on subjects you and I like to read about. The exquisite title poem prepares us for engagements with blue jays, bank swallows, wood thrushes—and also the pleasures of singing, fishing, even of aging. The language is to be savored and the hard-won wisdom taken to heart.
-Laurence Goldstein, author of Poetry Los Angeles: Reading the Essential Poems of the City
The poet uses eyes, "the most spiritual of the senses," and ears—"this recluse trills its two voice boxes / like Pan's double flute"—to present reflective narratives of the world in and around us, in backyards, at workplaces. Witnessing compulsions and hardships of contemporary life, Morin evinces winged sensibilities and deep-rooted compassion. His praise of a fellow poet ("Poetry Man") could apply to his own poems' "fire smoldering in the belly" rising "to enchant the heart and brain."
-Lyn Coffin, poet, playwright, fiction writer, and translator
Some of my favorite contemporary poems are in earlier books by Ed Morin, and this fresh chapbook offers several more, especially the family and love poems, poems of conscience and responses to the violence of needless war and domestic crimes. The poems have remarkable range in portraying a holdup, which almost cost his life, and his avocation as an actor and professor. This collection is a distinguished addition to the Cervena Barva Series. I hope it inspires a longer Collected Poems, for this poet deserves honors and attention.
-David Ray, author of 20 books including Music of Time: New and Selected Poems
$7.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9966894-7-2 | 44 Pages

Released July 21, 2016
No More Happy Endings by Milan Djurasovic
No More Happy Endings by Milan Djurasovic
Milan Djurasovic is a Bosnian Serb from Mostar, the descendant of delightful peasants and modest working-class stock. He lives in northern California, where he works as a paraeducator. No More Happy Endings is his first collection of poems and short stories.
"The bedtime stories of my grandmother, Baba Jela, changed after the Bosnian civil war. Before the shooting began, her stories were ordinary, positive, life-affirming, with a clever hero or good-natured idiot overcoming challenges and a greedy foe soon reduced to a pitiful scrub. At the end, the world would turn out rosy and just, and taking part in it made sense. But after a war of nearly 100,000 deaths, millions of displaced bodies and souls, and decay peering out of every crevice, such propriety seemed unnatural. So Baba Jela decided to get rid of it. While other elderly men and woman decided to end their own lives after realizing that nothing would ever again be the way it was before the war, Baba turned her stories and lullabies dark and horrifying, her own way of refusing to play along with uncontrollable circumstances."
Cover Design: Aleksandra Djurasovic
$12.00 | ISBN: 978-0-9966894-8-9 | 30 Pages


ČERVENÁ BARVA PRESS was founded in April of 2005. The press solicits poetry, fiction, and plays from various writers around the world, and holds open contests regularly for its chapbooks, postcards, broadsides and full-length books. I look for work that has a strong voice, is unique, and that takes risks with language. Please see submission guidelines for current information. I encourage queries from Central and Eastern Europe.


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